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Pappy’s comes to animals’ rescue
by Tim Delaney
Jun 29, 2014 | 559 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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Melanie Wright, founder of Pappy's Animal Rescue, holds Peanut, who was recently adopted out . Wright has about six to seven animals now but intends to expand the animal rescue service.
Tim Delaney photo Melanie Wright, founder of Pappy's Animal Rescue, holds Peanut, who was recently adopted out . Wright has about six to seven animals now but intends to expand the animal rescue service.
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One of the six or seven animals at Pappy's Animal Rescue is an eager puppy, left. He is a mixed pit bull named Boss, wanting a friend. Founder of Pappy’s Melanie Wright, said she named the puppy Boss because he rules the kennel. The animal rescue facilities are at 290 Fairground Road. Phone 361-827-3732 to report animals needing rescue or to donate or volunteer.
One of the six or seven animals at Pappy's Animal Rescue is an eager puppy, left. He is a mixed pit bull named Boss, wanting a friend. Founder of Pappy’s Melanie Wright, said she named the puppy Boss because he rules the kennel. The animal rescue facilities are at 290 Fairground Road. Phone 361-827-3732 to report animals needing rescue or to donate or volunteer.
slideshow
Tim Delaney photo
Big Boy is the only cat at Pappy's Animal Rescue currently. He is an inside cat who has to stay away from other cats because he tested positive for feline AIDS.
Tim Delaney photo Big Boy is the only cat at Pappy's Animal Rescue currently. He is an inside cat who has to stay away from other cats because he tested positive for feline AIDS.
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REFUGIO – His eyes, big and brown, held the deep desire he had for a friend. And anybody who befriended him would have a special partner for life: loyal, forgiving, understanding and dependable.

He, like many of his ilk, however, usually would be discarded as a waste of time, energy and money, then left abandoned.

We see so many of them, these discarded animals by the road—out in the middle of nowhere, bewildered, starving, sick and cast to some horrible fate.

Fortunately, many counties have pet rescue organizations that can take abandoned animals in ’til they are adopted by someone who really wants and can love them.

And now, Refugio County has a budding rescue operation called Pappy’s Animal Rescue, begun by Melanie Wright.

Wright said the organization is still in the process of attaining its non-profit status, the 501c3. She added that once that is attained, all donations would be a tax deduction for donors. And possibly, the operation could receive grants.

“I’ve always rescued animals. If I found strays, I would try to find the owner or an owner for them,” Wright said.

Wright said she used to be a “cat person.” But something changed that one stormy day several years ago.

“I saw a dog sitting out in the rain and cold,” she said.

“I picked him up and put him in the car,” she said.

The dog looked like a miniature schnauzer and was well trained.

“I figured he was somebody’s dog. I was in Corpus Christi then,” Wright said.

She tried and tried to find the dog’s owner but to no avail. She named him Pappy.

“Pappy became a good companion for 10 years,” Wright said. “And I became a dog person.”

Wright already has a board of directors for the animal rescue organization: Victor Garza, Dr. Gary Wright, Janine Victoria Trinidad, Kathy Wallace, Linda Warling, Crystal Perez and Dr. Lois Cochran Duelberg.

Since June 1 when the animal rescue organization began to take shape, one female dog named Brittany was adopted out.

“The first one happened to be a worker fixing some plumbing problems,” Wright said.

“I’ve had plenty of calls to take others, but I just don’t have the facilities for them right now,” she said.

Just the same, she urged people to call Pappy’s when they see a stray or abandoned animal because she will make an effort to find the owner or find an owner.

Wright also said getting the animals spayed and neutered was costly.

However, veterinarian Lois Duelberg has helped in vaccinating and deworming.

“She is offering a reduced rate on spaying and neutering,” Wright said.

Wright said often times, people will feed strays.

“They don’t want to call animal control because they know they will kill them,” she said.

So, an animal rescue facility is needed in many ways.

“I will be setting up an account,” Wright said.

For now, people can find the organization on Facebook at facebook.com/pappysanimalrescue.

Or donations can be sent to P.O. Box 237. Refugio 78377.

The same contact information can be used for those wanting to volunteer to help the rescue operation.

Also, a jar for donations is displayed at Dr. Gary Wright’s office at 426 N. Alamo St.

Or phone 361-827-3732 for more information.

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