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Feeding Hungry Souls ‘To share God’s love in a tangible way’
by Jason Collins
Sep 16, 2012 | 1529 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
a prayer is said as volunteers gather and prepare to sort enough food to feed upwards of 250 people. The volunteers at First Baptist Church do this distribution on the fourth Sunday of every month.
a prayer is said as volunteers gather and prepare to sort enough food to feed upwards of 250 people. The volunteers at First Baptist Church do this distribution on the fourth Sunday of every month.
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Shiloh Dial, Nathaniel Barris and Emily Barris along with Janice Barris help get things ready before the needy arrive.
Shiloh Dial, Nathaniel Barris and Emily Barris along with Janice Barris help get things ready before the needy arrive.
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Dorothy Isaacks helps get everything ready during last months food distribution at First Baptist Church.
Dorothy Isaacks helps get everything ready during last months food distribution at First Baptist Church.
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It’s about more than just a can of pineapple or a loaf of bread.

Greg Traylor, pastor at First Baptist Church, said that, while the food the congregation members pass out on the fourth Sunday of every month will nourish the body, he hopes that the people get a little something more.

“It is to share God’s love in a tangible way so that they know God cares for them,” he said. “We are, in essence, God’s hands and feet.”

For more than 10 years, volunteers from the church and community have gathered to pass out canned goods and frozen meats to the hundred or more needy in Bee County.

“It is a physical way to demonstrate we care about people and that God cares about people,” he said. “It is more than just saying it. It is doing it.”

About 30 volunteers gathered this past month at the church to hand out food — a typical amount for any given month.

During that distribution, 114 households or about 245 people were fed.

“Most of these people really need it,” Traylor said. “Most of them say they wouldn’t be here if they had any other way to feed their family.”

While they always provide the staples a family will need, they also provide treats, like ice cream, when they can. And, by having the food delivered that morning, they are also able to hand out frozen foods like meat.

Food is purchased thanks to donations and bought from H-E-B and the Food Bank in Corpus Christi.

This isn’t the only food distribution. First United Methodist Church holds a similar distribution on the second Saturday of every month. Then there is also The Table at FUMC, which serves a noon meal on the third Saturday of the month.

Traylor is proud of the work done by the volunteers, but he knows that more is always needed.

“For people here in need, there is a limited supply of help,” he said. “There is a lot being done, but there is still lot more that needs to be done.”

Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 121, or at editor@mySouTex.com.

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