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Horned Toad: Local club supporting horned toads planning many activities for this year
by Joe Baker
Aug 11, 2012 | 1805 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Kenedy resident H. J. Kolinek photographed this Horned Toad which he found just south of Kenedy. Once a common sight in Karnes County, the Horned Toad otherwise known as the Texas Horned Lizard, has seen a decline in numbers in recent years.
Kenedy resident H. J. Kolinek photographed this Horned Toad which he found just south of Kenedy. Once a common sight in Karnes County, the Horned Toad otherwise known as the Texas Horned Lizard, has seen a decline in numbers in recent years.
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KENEDY– Local members of the Horned Toad Club met last week to discuss plans for upcoming projects.

Volunteers will work to complete door-to-door surveys, a Horned Toad Club display will be made for Lonesome Dove Fest, and A new documentary film entitled, “Where did the Horny Toad Go?” will be shown.

According to club organizer Dr. Wade Phelps, when Kenedy was named the Horned Lizard Capital of Texas in 2001, surveys were conducted to determine the extent of horned toad populations in the city of Kenedy.

“The Horned Lizard Conservation Society and Texas Parks and Wildlife are very interested not only in continuing the study of horned lizard populations in Kenedy, they are also interested in extending that study to Runge, Falls City, and Karnes City,” Phelps said. “The organizations assisted the club last year to revisit some of the home sites in the original surveys. The club now needs to finish revisiting all the sites.”

The Horned Toad Club will set up a display Saturday, September 22 at Lonesome Dove Fest for fun and education. Possibilities include games, photo displays and visits from horned toad authorities on conservation and habitat preservation. More work will be done to complete the plan.

“Where Did The Horny Toad Go?” is a newly released documentary about horned lizards that features Kenedy and Karnes County among other locations in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arizona.

“The producers are trying to sell their program for future broadcast through cable television outlets,” Phelps explained. “Right now, the Horned Toad Club is offering to share the film on DVD along with commentary and demonstrations from club members. The club hopes that viewing the film will help the local community to understand the special place that Kenedy and Karnes County hold in the world of horned lizards.”

Anyone who is interested in arranging a private screening for any local group or organization is encouraged to call Dr. Wade Phelps at 830-583-9891.

The Horned Toad Club is glad to receive your photos and reports of horned toad sightings.

“The information is helpful to further the efforts to slow the disappearance of the Texas horned lizard, our official state reptile, from Karnes County and the South Texas area,” Phelps said.

To pass along a photo or report a sighting to the club, contact Dr. Wade Phelps by telephone at 830-583-9891 or in person at 330 W. Live Oak Street in Kenedy.
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