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Goliad's First United Methodist Church receives historical marker
May 07, 2014 | 205 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Pastor John Alsbrooks welcomes guests to First United Methodist Church in Goliad during its historical marker presentation Sunday.
Pastor John Alsbrooks welcomes guests to First United Methodist Church in Goliad during its historical marker presentation Sunday.
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Jimmy Schulze and Patsy Light of the Goliad County Historical Commission pose by the historical marker unveiled Sunday at Goliad’s First United Methodist Church.
Jimmy Schulze and Patsy Light of the Goliad County Historical Commission pose by the historical marker unveiled Sunday at Goliad’s First United Methodist Church.
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GOLIAD – Another vital Goliad historical landmark has officially been recognized.

First United Methodist Church, first built at its present site in 1877, was awarded an Official Texas Historical Marker on Sunday. Approximately 100 people gathered at the church Sunday afternoon for the unveiling of the marker.

Jimmy Schulze and Patsy Light of the Goliad County Historical Commission spearheaded the efforts to have FUMC officially recognized by the Texas Historical Commission.

Pastor John Alsbrooks welcomed the guests before Goliad County Historical Commission Chairman Bil Montague, Goliad County Judge David Bowman and Schulze and Light addressed the audience.

“My research for this marker was time-consuming, reading through 100-plus years of history,” Light said.

Danish architect Jules Leffland designed a Carpenter Gothic-style frame church at the site. Almost 25 years later, it was completely destroyed by the F4 tornado that claimed 115 lives in Goliad on May 18, 1902.

Schulze said during Sunday’s ceremony that he unearthed glass and square nails from the original church while digging the hole for the marker.

The congregation rebuilt the church and an annex was added on the north side of the facility in 1936.

“After the church was destroyed in 1902 by the cyclone, it rose from the ground like a phoenix,” Light said.

Light provided details of the 12 stained glass windows inside the church during her presentation.

“It is vital that as we move forward, we do not forget our past,” said Schulze, who is chairman of the FUMC board of trustees. “Not only will this Texas Historical Marker provide awareness in this community of our fascinating history, but, it will become a building block for the promotion of local tourism.”
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