directory
Plateresque style obvious at mission
by By Beth Ellis, Goliad State Park Ranger II
Aug 14, 2013 | 421 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Estipite pillars are shown as part of the Mission Espiritu Santo chapel’s architectural style.
Estipite pillars are shown as part of the Mission Espiritu Santo chapel’s architectural style.
slideshow
Editor’s note: This is the fourth of a four-part series by Goliad State Park’s Beth Ellis on the architectural heritage of Mission Espiritu Santo.

Spanish Colonial architecture in the New World is a synthesis of several influences that span many centuries.

These include the Roman Empire (via original structures, and the re-discovery of the works of Roman architect Marcus Vitruvius Pollio in 1511 A.D.), the Islamic Moors of North Africa, and Christian Europe.

Classical, Moorish, and Gothic influences melded in the 1500s, to produce the Spanish art style known as plateresque. In the New World, the term was soon applied to architecture as well.

See the rest of the story in this week's Advance-Guard.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet