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City has new weapon in its fight against mosquitoes
by Gary Kent
Jun 24, 2013 | 2039 views | 0 0 comments | 60 60 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Henry Muñoz drops a briquet into standing water at Poesta Creek on South Tyler Street Thursday afternoon. Muñoz has been treating standing water inside the city with the larvicide to kill mosquitoes before they become adults. The treatment leaves a film on the top of pools of water that can cover 100 square feet. But the water only harms mosquito larvae and is safe for pets.
Henry Muñoz drops a briquet into standing water at Poesta Creek on South Tyler Street Thursday afternoon. Muñoz has been treating standing water inside the city with the larvicide to kill mosquitoes before they become adults. The treatment leaves a film on the top of pools of water that can cover 100 square feet. But the water only harms mosquito larvae and is safe for pets.
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BEEVILLE — There has been just enough rain so far this summer to bring out the mosquitoes.

But the staff at the city equipment yard on South Jackson Street has been out in force fighting the annual war against the disease-carrying pests.

Street Superintendent Albert Bridge said his assistant, Henry Muñoz, is leading the attack for the city.

As employees run the spraying equipment through Beeville’s neighborhoods, Muñoz has been dropping his own bombs in standing water around the city.

“We’re using a new larvicide this year,” Bridge said. The larger tablets that used to last 30 days have been replaced by Fourstar Briquets. The tablets are not only smaller but they work differently and some last up 180 days before retreatment is required.

Bridge said the new briquets were recommended by Apapco, the company that provides all equipment and insecticides the city uses.

Muñoz said one of the benefits of the new briquets is that when the water recedes, the briquets stop working and then begin working again when they become wet.

Bridge said the briquets being used here will work from about 45 to 90 days.

“Our problem is that we can’t go onto private property,” Bridge said. Even if the owner of a piece of property where there is a standing water problem asks the city to drop in some briquets, city employees cannot do that.

“They’re safe for the environment,” Bridge added. Pets can drink the water and they will not feel any effects.

“The only thing they affect is mosquito larvae,

Bridge said.

“What really hurts is tall grass,” Bridge said. Yards and vacant lots that have not been mowed provide excellent breeding grounds for mosquitoes and tall grass even protects adult mosquitoes from the spray that the city uses.

Gary Kent is a reporter at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 120, or at reporter@mySouTex.com.
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