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Toadies bring rock, nostalgia
Aug 13, 2012 | 1101 views | 1 1 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Contributed photo
The Toadies, Mark Reznicek, Clark Vogeler, Doni Blair and Todd Lewis, played at Brewster Street Ice House in Corpus Christi July 19 in support of their upcoming release, Play.Rock.Music., out July 31.
Contributed photo The Toadies, Mark Reznicek, Clark Vogeler, Doni Blair and Todd Lewis, played at Brewster Street Ice House in Corpus Christi July 19 in support of their upcoming release, Play.Rock.Music., out July 31.
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By Paul Gonzales

Bee-Picayune staff

Corpus Christi — The Toadies have been around the block a time or two. Especially in Texas, where they formed in Fort Worth in 1989 and disbanded in 2001, only to reform again in 2008 with new bassist Doni Blair.

Todd Lewis, lead singer/guitarist, had formed The Burden Brothers during the Toadies hiatus and had a few, small radio hits. Guitarist Clark Vogeler headed to Hollywood to edit movies, and drummer Mark Reznicek joined the country-western band Eleven Hundred Springs.

But after some personal changes left the Burden Brothers on hiatus, Lewis began writing new songs by himself and felt they were Toadies songs.

He called up the old gang and, shortly after reforming, released the album No Deliverance.

Another album followed, 2010’s Feeler as well as Live at Austin City Limits Music Festival.

But after all the turmoil and personal differences, would the Toadies still be the Toadies?

On July 19, the band returned to Corpus Christi and played at Brewster Street Ice House to rev up support for their upcoming July 31 release, Play.Rock.Music.

The Toadies shared the stage with ’90s indie rock icons Helmet and Austin’s grrl fronted indie rock band Ume.

But it was clearly the Toadies everyone was there to see.

Blasting through song after song, Lewis’ voice tore through Brewster’s audience and out onto the patio, where throngs of fans stood on picnic tables and sat on the wooden railings, bobbing their heads and whipping their hair.

They incited crowd to chants and cheers following every one of their songs.

Lewis bounced and bounded and ran and rocked all over the stage, while Vogeler, mainly poised in front of his microphone, delivered his well-manicured, soft-spoken guitar riffs behind Lewis’ and tossed his voice out every so often to audience’s excitement.

Blair’s bass lines, echoed throughout the night, followed by Reznicek’s machine gun pounding on the drums.

The crowd was soaked with sweat and alcohol, spilling gallons on the floor as they reached out to touch the band, looking a lot like their younger selves on stage, bathed in the red, blue and green hues of stage lights.

The audience screamed every syllable to every song at the top of their lungs until the band finally bowed out and praised the city for giving them such a great time and showing them much love.

But there was something missing.

The mass of people didn’t disburse when the band stepped off stage.

They screamed for more. They wanted the one missing element of the entire night’s showcase. The one song everyone in the world seems to know. The Toadies’ biggest hit.

Brewster’s erupted as the band bounded back on stage. They joked with the crowd and played the song mostly everyone that night showed up to hear.

“Tyler.”

And after the show, the only question on anyone’s mind was: “When are they coming back?”
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Blastoderm55
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August 14, 2012
Great article! A set starting with Away (maybe?) and ending with Tyler sounds great. I was bummed when the Toadies broke up years back, but enjoyed the side projects. Maybe I'll catch them live now that they're back.