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Emergency crews called to help motorists trapped in flash flood
by Gary Kent
May 02, 2013 | 2537 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Firefighters rescue motorists trapped in their submerged car at South Tyler Street and Poesta Creek Monday evening. A massive thunderstorm brought a downpour of water to the city which caused temporary flooding in parts of the city. Spots in this photo are due to the heavy rain still coming down as rescue crews drive into the water to get the people out of the vehicle.
Firefighters rescue motorists trapped in their submerged car at South Tyler Street and Poesta Creek Monday evening. A massive thunderstorm brought a downpour of water to the city which caused temporary flooding in parts of the city. Spots in this photo are due to the heavy rain still coming down as rescue crews drive into the water to get the people out of the vehicle.
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Firefighters, police and EMS were called to several high water rescues Tuesday evening because of motorists caught off guard by the flash flood.
Firefighters, police and EMS were called to several high water rescues Tuesday evening because of motorists caught off guard by the flash flood.
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A sedan is swamped by rainwater running down the street at the intersection of East Milam and South Adams streets. Members of the Beeville Volunteer Fire Department responded to the incident and retrieved two occupants safely.
A sedan is swamped by rainwater running down the street at the intersection of East Milam and South Adams streets. Members of the Beeville Volunteer Fire Department responded to the incident and retrieved two occupants safely.
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BEEVILLE – When it rains three inches or more in a little less than an hour in Beeville, most motorists know there are a few places to avoid.

Unfortunately not all know this which caused several cars to end up swamped Monday afternoon when torrential rains fell on the city, trapping at least four vehicles in high water.

Members of the Beeville Volunteer Fire Department already had rushed to the Beeville Municipal Airport as the storm first arrived.

A Beeville Police Department dispatcher had radioed patrol units and firefighters that someone had seen a small airplane, that apparently had been flying into Live Oak County, turn around and apparently try to get back to Beeville’s runway.

The dispatcher said the caller had indicated that the plane’s engine could have been on fire. But heavy rains and lightning could have forced the plane to try to get to Beeville.

Emergency responders sent two ambulances from Angel Care Ambulance Service along with a rural fire truck and several police vehicles.

By the time the emergency crews arrived, the rain had become heavier. But as the crews huddled in their vehicles to stay dry, no plane appeared over the airport.

Eventually the emergency vehicles returned to the city just in time to respond to calls that several vehicles had stalled in high water.

One fireman said that in almost every incident, the trapped motorists had driven around barricades set up by city street crews and had tried to cross rising waters.

The first such call went out at 5:09 p.m. when a vehicle was caught in high water at the intersection of South Harrison and East Crockett streets.

Firemen quickly informed others that their high water rescue vehicle was out of commission for repairs.

Fortunately, the vehicle at Harrison and Crockett was able to get out of its predicament on its own.

The next call involved a car that was rapidly being enveloped in water at the intersection of East Milam and South Adams streets.

Two occupants were taken out of that vehicle.

Then firemen were sent to the intersection of U.S. Highway 181 and State Highway 202 at 5:25 p.m. Again, the vehicle was able to get out of the water without help.

The last call came right at 6 p.m. when a vehicle tried to cross Poesta Creek on South Tyler Street.

Two occupants were reached by a fireman using his personal truck and were rescued from the rising water.

Firemen were quick to remind Beeville residents that whenever several inches of rain falls on the city in such a short time, the same areas tend to flood and crossing certain intersections can be risky.

City street crews know where those areas are and they put out barricades for a reason. No one should think it is safe to drive around a barricade and try getting across the creek or intersection.

Gary Kent is a reporter at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 120, or at reporter@mySouTex.com.
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