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Drafting a new career
by Christina Rowland
Jul 21, 2012 | 2791 views | 0 0 comments | 35 35 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Christina Rowland photo
Jack Young (right), drafting and design instructor, explains the two-year associate program to a potentially interested person. The program includes training in  mechanical, electrical, architectural, computer assisted drafting (CAD) and more.
Christina Rowland photo Jack Young (right), drafting and design instructor, explains the two-year associate program to a potentially interested person. The program includes training in mechanical, electrical, architectural, computer assisted drafting (CAD) and more.
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BEEVILLE – Hoping to work in the art field one day, but without the starving artist aspect?

Drafting and design might be a career to look into that wouldn’t involve the starving part of becoming an artist.

It was one of several degree programs that were on display at the first Industry Expo Eagle Ford Shale at Coastal Bend College on Thursday afternoon.

Jack Young, drafting and design instructor for course, said the program is a two-year degree in which students would leave with an associates in applied science. At that point, the student would either be able to transfer into a university to pursue a bachelors degree or go directly into the workforce.

He said drafting and design is a specialty field of engineering and that after receiving their associates degree, about 60 percent of the students chose to go directly into the workforce.

Average pay for a job in drafting and design is from $24.33 to $33.51 an hour.

Every fall semester Young takes his students on a field trip to visit companies such as Fluor in Houston, Kiewitt in Ingleside or M&S Engineering in Spring Branch to see drafting and design employees in their element, doing their job. All of the companies Young visits are companies where his former students are now employed.

He said someone who likes to draw, build things and is a stickler for detail is the kind of person to which the drafting and design program might appeal.

Excel Drivers Services was also on hand to tell and show people about getting CDL class A licenses.

The company now offers classes at all four CBC locations. The company offers several classes including permitting classes, refresher courses and novice classes. The novice class teaches persons the skills they need to go down and take their actual test to get their CDL class A license.

Instructor Karl Taylor said there has been an increased interest in the classes in the last 16 months and people from every age demographic come through the door.

He described the CDL class A course as an intense three-week course. Students spend 10 to 12 hours a day in class five days a week.

“Within a couple of days, you will be behind the wheel,” he said.

During the actual driving portion of a class, there is one instructor and no more than three students to a truck (the students not driving wait in the sleeper portion of truck until it is their turn).

“We will not put you in a situation we don’t feel like you can handle,” Taylor said.

The company had its simulation machine on site Wednesday for potential students and anyone interested to try out. The simulation machine allows for a driver be placed in any situation such as rain, high wind, snow, night driving conditions and more.

“Anything you can run across in the real world we can do here,” Taylor said.

The steering wheel will even shake and pull to one side, simulating a blowout.

CBC President Dr. Beatriz Espinoza welcomed staff, exhibitors and potential students to the event. The annual event will showcase what the college has to offer as far as educating people. Many of the companies hiring for jobs in the Eagle Ford Shale are looking for an educated workforce and CBC is dedicated to provided the essentials to advance people to that point.

“An education means a career in the Eagle Ford Shale,” she said.

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