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Club ‘floats’ and gets up-close view of county
by Tim Delaney
Mar 29, 2014 | 76 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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Carolyn Wilson of Montgomery shows her and her husband Ken's powered parachute on Saturday, March 16. Wilson is holding the grand champion trophy she and her husband won at the EAA AirVenture OshKosh.
Tim Delaney photo Carolyn Wilson of Montgomery shows her and her husband Ken's powered parachute on Saturday, March 16. Wilson is holding the grand champion trophy she and her husband won at the EAA AirVenture OshKosh.
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Contributed photo
A powered parachute aircraft "floats" over Refugio County.
Contributed photo A powered parachute aircraft "floats" over Refugio County.
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REFUGIO COUNTY – The feeling is one of the closest to floating on air.

And that feeling comes when you fly a powered parachute, according to Carolyn Wilson, a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 123, Bay Area Recreational Flyers power parachute club. Wilson was with her husband, Ken.

The club met at the Refugio County Airport on Saturday, March 16.

“We like meeting here. This was where we decided to have our meeting this month,” said Wilson, who also noted that the club meets at different locations each month.

Those present at the meeting were the president of the club, Lowell Henderson, and his wife, Margo, of Houston.

Also at the meeting were Corinne Bailey of Giddings, Bud Wiitala of Swinney, Alan and Connie Fletcher of Beeville and a group out of Pharr – Drew Cochran and Kirk and Aric Carkenord.

Wilson said the club always goes over safety issues, as well as flying their unique aircraft, which looks sort of like a go-cart with a propeller and a parachute attached.

She said the club pays dues and ends up giving a $500 donation to a worthy cause, which for the club includes Houses for Troops and food banks.

Wilson and her husband, Ken, in 2007 won the Grand Champion Gold at the EAA AirVenture event in Oshkosh, Wis. The air show is an international show in which several countries participate.

“We follow all the same FAA regulations as fixed wings do,” Wilson said.

“We have a support pilot’s license,” she added.

The purpose of powered parachute aircraft is to fly low and slow.

Wilson said top speed is around 30 mph.

She said the craft is great for ranching, searching to recover pieces of crashes and search and rescue operations.

In the air, the pilot gets treated to beautiful vistas wherever he or she is flying.

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